From printed publications to tips on raising awareness of missions in your church, Resonate offers resources for all your missions needs.

  • Faith Promise Giving: In Faith Promise, individual church members make promises to give as the Lord directs. This resource answers FAQ's along with other information on Faith Promise giving.
    • In Faith Promise, individual church members – including adults, young people, and children – prayerfully ask how much God would have them give to missions. Then they make promises to give as the Lord directs. Such giving is a step of faith, trusting God to provide the resources to fulfill these commitments. Faith Promise FAQ's:
      • How does Faith Promise work? Each church member fills out a commitment card that details the member’s monthly, quarterly, or yearly commitment. The cards ordinarily have two parts. Church members take home the signed part to remember their commitments. The unsigned part is collected and totaled.
      • Why promote Faith Promise? Churches that use Faith Promise testify that the excitement and vision for missions increase, as does the amount of money given for missionary support. They cite two reasons for this: First, it seems that missions committees do a better job of informing the congregation about missionaries or projects before Faith Promise commitments are made. Second, church members tend to give and be more involved when they make personal and prayerful commitments. Faith Promise is intentional, not an afterthought.
      • How do churches collect Faith Promise? Many churches set aside one Sunday per month as their Missions Sunday or Faith Promise Sunday. Loose offerings that Sunday go into Faith Promise. Some churches prepare special Faith Promise envelopes that they make available to the congregation. Other churches prepare regular budget envelopes that allow for multiple designations, including Faith Promise gifts.
      • Why does Faith Promise result in increased giving for missions? Churches that use Faith Promise cite two reasons: First, it seems that missions committees do a better job of informing the congregation about the various missionaries or projects before Faith Promise commitments are made. Second, church members tend to give and be more involved when they make personal and prayerful commitments. Faith Promise is intentional, not an afterthought.
    • How to Organize Faith Promise in Your Church
      • With the church council’s endorsement, select and appoint a Faith Promise or missions committee. This committee should come to a clear understanding of the Faith Promise program and then prepare a proposal for the church council’s approval.
      • Begin the planning early. If you want to implement a Faith Promise program in the fall and need council approval, start planning in early spring. 
      • Introduce the approved program to the congregation several weeks or months before the initial Faith Promise or Missions Emphasis event.
      • As a committee, decide in advance which missionaries and/or projects you wish to support. Gather up-to-date information on these missionaries and/or projects and prepare a handout for the congregation 
  • Missionary Support. What is it?: Explains the process for supporting a Resonate missionary
  • Missionary Care: Outlines some of the items to keep in mind for caring for missionaries your church supports.
    • Enhance your church's mission and vision by strengthening the partnership between your church and Christian Reformed World Missions (CRWM) missionaries.
    • Staying Close through PRAYER
      • Resonate missionaries testify to the power of prayer in their lives and ministries. Become an effective prayer partner using these suggestions:
      • Sign up for ePray, a weekly email with prayer requests from Resonate missionaries.
      • Publish and distribute missionary letters as soon as possible.
      • Ask your pastor to remember your missionary's prayer requests in the congregational prayer and put urgent items on your church's prayer chain(s).
      • Let your missionaries know that you read their letters and pray for the items mentioned.
      • Ask your missionaries for timely prayer items and to share answers to prayer.
      • Pray for things that missionaries may not always mention such as spiritual health, emotional health, family health, relationships with colleagues, national leaders, political stability.
    • Staying Close through COMMUNICATION
      • Effective two-way communication is essential for developing a partnership between your congregation and the missionaries you support. Here are some hints to help you:
      • Find volunteers to regularly write or send emails to your missionaries. Ask your pastor to write also.
      • Send your church bulletins to your missionaries.
      • If your worship services are recorded, send the recordings to your missionaries.
      • Include your missionaries in your church directory. If possible, include their field address, phone number, and email address. Send a copy of the directory to your missionaries.
      • Prepare "care packages" for your missionaries at Christmas time.
      • Encourage your Sunday school kids, GEMS, and Cadets to communicate with your missionaries' kids.
      • Investigate the possibility of sending your pastor or members of the congregation to visit your missionary on the field.
    • Staying Close through SUPPORT
      • Missionary financial support comes to Resonate in a variety of ways:
      • Ministry Shares: About 28% of gifts from churches comes by way of Ministry Shares. Every church that gives Ministry Shares is involved in Resonate's ministry.
      • Gifts and Offerings: Many churches take special offerings for Resonate at Pentecost and/or as part of their Thanksgiving or Christmas offerings.
      • Special Projects: These are often projects related to a missionary the church supports. You might challenge your Sunday school, youth group or adult education classes to undertake a special project.
      • Missionary Support: Over 75% of CRCs support at least one Resonate missionary or project. The church makes an annual commitment and collects the gifts through Faith Promise, special offerings or church budgets.
    • Planning a MISSIONARY VISIT
      • A well-planned missionary visit can make a big difference in your congregation's vision for missions. Here are some hints to help you plan well:
      • Think of your missionaries as members of your congregation. Help them enter into the life of the congregation.
      • Involve your missionaries in one or more worship services. Most ordained missionaries love to preach. Many of the unordained do too.
      • As much as possible, work the missionary presentation into the worship service. Most missionary audiovisual programs are short and suitable for worship services.
      • Schedule a time for your missionaries to visit with your pastor. A chat over coffee or lunch works well.
      • If your church is the missionary's home church, schedule a time for your elders to visit them. This is an ideal time to offer spiritual encouragement.
      • Involve your missionaries in a variety of small-group settings such as prayer groups, adult-ed groups, youth group, GEMS, Cadets, home visits, potlucks, church picnics, etc.
      • Schedule a time with your congregation's decision-makers such as your church council, missions committee or deacons.
      • Ask your missionaries well in advance of their visit to talk about a topic particularly of interest to the congregation.
      • If there is a pastors gathering planned for your area, make arrangements for your missionary to attend.
      • Link missionary kids with same-aged kids in your congregation.
      • Include missionaries in social events.
    • Practical matters when planning for your missionary's visit:
      • You will hear from Resonate concerning your missionary's home service about four months before the event.
      • Talk with your missionary about available dates for your missionary to visit.
      • Talk with your missions committee or pastor about visit details. 
      • Continue to develop the visiting schedule.
      • Talk personally with your missionary at least two weeks in advance of the visit. Discuss and confirm all events.
      • Look at logistical things such as extension cords, projector tables, video projectors, etc.
      • On the day of the visit, meet your missionaries in the parking lot and shepherd them about. Make lunch arrangements if necessary.
  • Missionary Partnership FAQ's: A missionary partnership is a commitment between a congregation and a missionary family to pray faithfully for each other; to communicate faithfully with each other; and for the congregation to provide financial support. In this partnership, World Missions and the missionary family promise to receive the gifts with gratitude and expend them wisely in the extension of the Kingdom.
    • How much money must our congregation commit?
      • Resonate does not put a "price on the head" of its missionaries. We do ask, however, that the congregation make a commitment.
    • How do churches raise and collect those funds? 
      • Some use Faith Promise, a way in which members make personal commitments of support and the deacons establish a method of collecting the commitments.
      • Some congregations establish a regular special offering schedule for missionary support.
      • Some congregations make missionary support a part of their regular church budget.
    • Why should our congregation enter into a partnership in missions with a missionary? 
      • God has commanded us to, "Go and make disciples of all nations..." (Matthew 28:19)
      • The congregation’s vision for missions is sharpened through its interaction with a missionary.
      • The congregation will receive regular prayer letters from its missionary. 
      • The missionary will visit you during his/her home service.
    • How do we get started? 
      • A committee should set out a plan for partnering and get it approved by the church council and, perhaps, by the whole congregation.
      • A committee member should contact your national Resonate office and ask for partnership suggestions.
      • Keep the congregation informed about the process. It is very likely that someone in the congregation knows a Resonate missionary.
      • Resonate will supply your committee with one or more missionary names for your consideration.
    • What if our congregation cannot provide financial support but does want to become a Partner in Missions? 
      • World Missions is happy to help your congregation form a prayer partnership with a missionary family. Your congregation will receive a picture, prayer cards, prayer letters, and a home service visit from your missionary. 
  • [BROKEN LINK -->] Commissioning service litany: A responsive reading for commissioning a missionary

  • The Global Mission section of the Network offers a variety of other resources

If you are your church's go-to person on missions or are a member of a missions committee/global outreach team, these resources are especially for you:

  • Areas of Responsibility: Details what your missions committee should be achieving in five different categories
    • Leadership
      • ensure the church has a clear global missions vision and mandate for the team
      • provide leadership for missions in the church
      • assist church leaders in obeying the Great Commission
      • invite and appoint new team members
      • develop relationships with our denominational missions leaders
      • serve as liaison with mission agencies
      • develop a learning goal for the team (book study, webinar, conference)
    • Missions and Education Awareness
      • raise awareness of the church’s involvement through various communication avenues
      • teach about the biblical foundations of missions and the changing global Christian landscape
      • create and take learning opportunities about global Christianity & world religions
      • develop global awareness through arts (music, visual arts, drama skits)
      • plan an annual missions event and/or missions promotional events
      • research missions issues, topics & places the church is connected to
      • encourage living as global Christians, adopting lifestyles that consider global consequences
      • identify missions resources for small groups and church education and encourage their use
    • Plan
      • strategize how people of ages in the church can connect to global outreach in some way
      • make policies and procedures for the operation of the missions ministry (ex. funding requests)
      • identify and recommend priorities
      • plan the church’s missions ministry
      • approve new missionary and missions ministry partnerships
      • connect with ministries that best fit the interests, gifting and calling of our church
    • Stewardship
      • assist the Deacons in developing missions stewardship
      • develop the missions budget
      • administer the missions budget
      • ensure financial commitments are being fulfilled
      • process requests for funding from individuals/missions organizations
      • lead fundraising for missions ministry projects
    • Mobilize and Send
      • plan and encourage congregational prayer support for missions & missionaries
      • stimulate a response to needs and opportunities—prayer, care, financial, communication
      • see that missionaries are cared for and supported
      • encourage relationships between our members/small groups and our missionaries
      • build deep relationships with the people we send and organizations we support
      • organize venues/events for missionaries visits
      • find service opportunities globally/locally for individuals and groups
      • provide debriefing and emotional support to those returning from missions experiences
      • equip and enable individuals for personal involvement and short-term missions
      • serve as liaison with individuals sent and supported
  • Keys for Missions Committee Operation: Ten essential keys to operating your missions committee smoothly
    • Define your task:
    • Define missions for your church.
    • Draw your boundaries
  • Determine your responsibilities
    • Determine what qualities and skills you need:
    • Pray for what you need
    • Watch for individuals with the right qualities
    • Recruit them
  • Keep learning and growing:
    • Find out what ways you learn best
    • Identify appropriate resources and tools
    • Hold yourselves accountable
  • Build community:
    • Get to know one another
    • Communicate frequently
    • Pray for one another
    • Have fun
  • Model missions for the congregation:
    • Do missions yourself
    • Learn and pray
    • Give generously
  • Divide up the work for task teams:
    • Determine the teams you need
    • Find a good leader who has a passion for the area
    • Help the leader lay out a plan
  • Develop and use good policies and procedures:
    • Find out what policies you already have
    • Get input from church leaders and others
    • Approve and use the policy by sections
  • Plan ahead and follow your plans:
    • Establish a weekend planning time
    • Allow each task group to develop their own plans
    • Hold groups accountable to their timetables
  • Make your church leaders "heroes":
    • Pray for them all the time
    • Compliment and encourage them for everything they do right
    • Give them the "up-front" parts while you do the details
  • Do it all with excellence:
    • Be prepared to carry out your best ideas
    • Do it as well as the best thing in the church
  • Catalyst Services: A Resonate-recommended website that helps churches expand and improve their global efforts
  • The Global Missions section of the Network also has a number of great resources
  • Current Workshops & Consultations (Canada)
    • How to Get A GO Team Going
      • Churches are increasingly developing and owning their missions calling by establishing a missions leadership team. We’ll unpack what a Global Outreach (GO) Team looks like, qualities that make up an awesome team, how it can ignite a fire for missions, and steps to get started. Practical examples from other CRC’s will be shared.
    • Assessing Long-Term Missionary Commitments
      • When a missionary concludes service, there’s a flood of funding requests. Who should we support? How much? How long? When to start? This facilitated consultation unpacks key questions to ask, and assists in identifying priorities that make it clear who/what to say yes to, based on your church’s character.
    • Decoding Missions Charitable Giving
      • Discover how compliance with Canadian charitable giving regulations changes your church’s funding of missionaries, short-term teams and missions activities overseas. Through case studies, we’ll learn how to deal with murky situations on charitable giving.
    • Funding for Short-term Missions
      • Do mission trips light your fire but the prospect of fundraising turns you cold? Learn how fundraising is ministry, and discover practical, creative fundraising ideas you can use with your missions team.
    • How to Launch & Land Successfully
      • Learn how an effective short-term missions orientation AND debriefing can keep your short-term missions experience from having a bumpy landing. Many practical tips, tools, and resource referrals will be shared.
    • Short-Term Missions: Bringing the Learning Home
      • Find out how the excitement of overseas short-term missions can inform, ignite and open doors to personal growth and ministry opportunities in our communities back home.
    • Develop a Missions Policy / Mandate for Global Outreach
      • Missions Policies and Mandates find a clear path through decisions such as of how to fund and welcome back short-term missioners, which organizations to put on the offering schedule, and clarifying expectations of a Missions Committee. Having a clear framework ensures fairness in decision making, and that “someone is minding the store” on missions issues. We’ll review forward steps and look at how God has uniquely positioned your church for participation in His mission.
    • You Are HERE
      • The first step in re-thinking how missions ministry is structured or working in a church is to take stock of where you are now. Through a facilitated Missions Assessment Profile (MAP), leaders will discover the strengths and grow points in their current global outreach program.
    • Global Partnerships – Are You Ready?
      • If your church is considering a global partnership (i.e., building a sister church/community relationship) or if you’d just like to learn about his focused approach to missions, this workshop is for you. We’ll discover the goals and characteristics of a Global Partnership and the indicators to assess if your church may be ready for one. We’ll also discuss when its wise not to pursue a global partnership and how to move ahead if you are ready.
    • God-centered Missionary Care
      • Is missionary care by churches really necessary? We’ll explore the biblical heart of the “sender/sendee” relationship, when care is critical, and practical examples of excellent care.
    • For more information about these workshops or to schedule one for your congregation, contact Trish De Jong at tdejong@crcna.org or call 905-336-2920  ext. 4230
      • Note: specialized missions consultations are available, focused towards the particular topic or situation requested.