• October 15, 2020

    When Erica (not her real name) joined an online trauma healing workshop facilitated by your Resonate missionary Melissa Bos in Oman, she knew it would be important for her ministry—but she didn’t know God would use it to save someone’s life.

    Widespread Trauma

    Melissa, who partners with the Al Amana Centre, planned to host trauma healing for ministry leaders this coming fall. The trauma healing series is a resource from the Bible Society, and your Resonate missionaries use this educational series in countries throughout the world.

  • October 15, 2020

    Do you remember the first few weeks of the coronavirus pandemic? People were getting sick with a strange virus that doctors didn’t know how to treat. Businesses closed. People lost jobs. Hospitals were short on supplies. Store shelves were empty. There was so much loneliness, stress, frustration, and fear.

    During a time when people struggled to find hope, you made it possible for Resonate to continue spreading the good news of Jesus. Here are three ways God was at work through your support.

  • October 13, 2020

    Vladimir and Valentina were atheists—and they raised their four children without faith too. But your Resonate Global Mission missionary is witnessing the Holy Spirit stir hearts within this family in Eastern Europe.

    Belief in a Country

    Living in a communist country, Vladimir and Valentina put their faith in their nation. Vladimir was dedicated to his job working for the state and was eventually promoted to village administrator.

  • October 13, 2020

    Thanks to support from mission-minded people like you, a Christian Reformed church planted 15 years ago is having ripple effects in Christian leadership and church planting.

    A Call to Ministry

    Shortly after graduating from college, Brian Na started attending Grace Community Chapel, a Christian Reformed church that Pastor Jae Park planted in 2005 with support from Resonate Global Mission (Home Missions at the time). Na was moved by how God was working through the church and quickly got involved.

  • October 7, 2020

    In Nigeria, schools depend on tuition in order to pay salaries for teachers and staff. When COVID-19 hit and many parents lost their sources of income, many teachers throughout the country started working without pay.

    “Schools were trying to figure out how to respond to the needs of their students, parents, and staff,” said Sarah Aderemi, your Resonate Global Mission missionary who works with the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) in Nigeria. 

  • September 24, 2020

    Maura was an isolated teenager who didn’t take faith seriously. But then she joined an IMPACT club facilitated by the Nehemiah Center, a Resonate Global Mission partner in Nicaragua, and her life took a new direction.

  • September 23, 2020

    When the coronavirus pandemic hit, many people in the Dominican Republic worried if they would have enough food for themselves and their families. Young people who are part of Resonate Global Mission partner IMPACT clubs stepped up to help.

  • September 21, 2020

    Life can be tough in camps for people who are displaced within their country. When Baker Obua participated in Educational Care training facilitated by Resonate Global Mission, he wanted to encourage children in a camp in Uganda. So, he started to train children in praise and worship. Here's a glimpse of how God is at work.

  • September 16, 2020

    Estefany and Jefferson recently graduated from Tesoros de Dios, a Resonate Global Mission ministry partner in Nicaragua that provides education and therapy for people with disabilities. But today, Tesoros de Dios continues to provide a supportive Christian community for Estefany and Jefferson to grow in their identities as children of God—even as alumni.

  • September 10, 2020

    Earlier this year, when churches went virtual, there was great excitement about the number of views our worship services were getting online. But then, after Easter, those numbers started to dwindle. Some churches decided to begin meeting in person again but still found that their average attendance hovered around 50% of what they usually could expect in the summer. Surely, things would bounce back in the fall when the school year starts, and people are home from vacation, right?  

    Probably not. 

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